Wednesday, July 30, 2008

How to Build a Simple Drill-Powered Wood Lathe

Build a Simple Drill-Powered Wood Lathe
I've posted in the past about a simple drill-powered lathe made by Gizzly. Here is a do-it-yourself version by Andrew Birkett. He made his lathe from two large bearings, some steel rod, a bit of steel plate, and a power drill. He's documented his entire build process in words and photographs.

Here's his page describing How to Build a Simple Drill-Powered Wood Lathe.

He also points out a really cool book on How to Build Your Own Metal Working Lathe, which is part of an entire series by Dave Gingery that walks you through how to create an entire machine shop from the scratch. An amazing accomplishment. When/if I have a large chunk of time, this is something I would love to to do. I picture casually saying to admirers, "Oh, that milling machine...yeah...I built it from scratch."


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3 Comments:

Anonymous Anonymous said...

That should be Dave Gingery (David J. Gingery), not
Gingerly. His BUILD YOUR OWN METAL WORKING SHOP FROM
SCRAP series is classic. The first project is to
build The Charcoal Foundry [ISBN: 0960433082],
which uses charcoal to melt the aluminum.
Then, you use the foundry to cast parts for a
metal lathe with a 7" swing and 12" between centers.
Next, using the foundry and lathe, you build a
metal shaper. The milling machine is the fourth
project. The fifth project is a drill press. The
sixth project is a dividing head and deluxe
accessories, including change gears for the metal
lathe, so it can cut screw threads! The seventh book
in the series is about designing and building the
sheet metal lathe. If you outgrow the charcoal
foundry (like I did) he's published BUILDING A
GAS FIRED CRUCIBLE FURNACE as well as HOW TO DESIGN
& BUILD CENTRIFUGAL FANS FOR THE HOME SHOP. I used
that one to design and build the hi-pressure, low
volume Turbo Blower for my gas-fired crucible
furnace. Of course, you learn a lot from making the
wood patterns, and molding them in sand molds, using
custom made wooden flasks. You'll also learn a lot
by building the machines. But Dave walks you through
everything, step-by-step. So, once you have a metal
working shop, you can design and build robots, right?

July 30, 2008 at 9:04 PM  
Blogger Alain said...

Love the concept but the drill lathe is dangerous as heck, the square "chuck" used to hold workpiece becomes a saw blade when spinning. Think fingers in fan. Use something round to mount workpiece.

August 5, 2008 at 8:03 AM  
Blogger Dug North said...

Alain,

Agreed, a round base would be much safer!

For this fellow's purposes, I am not sure why he didn't just put some threads on the end of the spindle and screw his piece of wood directly on to it. No face-plate needed.

Regards,

Dug

August 5, 2008 at 8:41 AM  

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